There was a raw wind blowing off the small harbor. It carried the salt of the sea with it, and the smell of imminent rain. The lone rider shrugged. Even though it was late summer, it seemed to have been raining constantly over the past week. Perhaps in this country it rained all the time, no matter what the season.

“Summer and winter, nothing but rain,” he said quietly to his horse. Not surprisingly, the horse said nothing.

“Except, of course, when it snows,” the rider continued. “Presumably, that’s so you can tell it’s winter.” This time, the horse shook its shaggy mane and vibrated its ears, the way horses do. The rider smiled at it. They were old friends.

Book Summary

Rangers walk the line between life and death every day, but never before has that line appeared so thin or death felt so certain. Hot on the trail of the Outsiders-a cult that’s been making its way from kingdom to kingdom, conning the innocent out of their few valuables-Will and Halt are ambushed by the cult’s deadly assassins. Pierced by a poisoned arrow, Will’s mentor is near death and in dire need of the one antidote that can save his life. Time is not on Will’s side as he journeys day and night through the harsh terrain to Grimsdell Wood in search of the one person with the power to cure Halt: Malkallam the Sorcerer. The worldwide phenomenon that is Ranger’s Apprentice continues, with a story in which every second counts.

My Experiences

This book sent my heart racing. Like nothing before, Halt is in PERIL. His very life is on the line. The sorrow and pain you feel in this book, is not created in any other. Feel the danger. Feel the emotions. Feel the suspense. This book is definitely a keepsake. In this book, I cried and it felt like the end. Without Halt, there is no more happy Will. (Reference to Ranger’s Apprentice: The Royal Ranger (Book 12; Last book) By: John Flanagan) Feel the power behind this book.

Book Excerpt

“Halt regarded him. He loved Horace like a younger brother. Even like a second son, after Will. He admired his skill with a sword and his courage in battle. But sometimes, just sometimes, he felt an overwhelming desire to ram the young warrior’s head against a convenient tree.
“You have no sense of drama or symbolism, do you?” he asked.
“Huh?” replied Horace, not quite understanding. Halt looked around for a convenient tree. Luckily for Horace, there were none in sight.”


“Maybe we should have gone with him,” he said, a few minutes after his friend was lost to sight.
“Three of us would make four times the noise he will,” Halt said.
Horace frowned, not quite understanding the equation. “Wouldn’t three of us make three times the noise?”
Halt shook his head. “Will and Tug will make hardly any noise. Neither will Abelard and I. But as for you and that moving earthquake you call a horse…” He gestured at Kicker and left the rest unsaid.”


“Would you have done that in his place? Would you have left him and gone on?”
“Of course I would!” Halt replied immediately. But something in his voice rang false and Horse looked at him, raising one eyebrow. He’d waited a long time for an opportunity to use that expression of disbelief on Halt.
After a pause, the Ranger’s anger subsided.
“All right. Perhaps I wouldn’t,” he admitted. Then he glared at Horace. “And stop raising that eyebrow on me. You can’t even do it properly. Your other eyebrow moves with it!”


“Hunting party,” Horace said
Both Halt and Will looked at him sarcastically.
“You think?” Will said. “Maybe they found the deer and brought him back to repair him.”


“You’re dropping the bow hand as you release,” he called, although Halt certainly wasn’t.
His mentor looked around, saw him, and replied pithily, “I believe your grandmother needs lessons in sucking eggs.”


“I’ll build mine tomorrow,” Horace said through a mouthful of food. “This is excellent, Will! When I have grandchildren, I’ll name them all after you!”

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