My father’s birthday was coming up, and I decided to make a card for him (as I always do). For inspiration, I looked at some of the birthday cards I had received over the years. I ended up looking at the birthday cards I had received earlier this year. What I read, almost brought me to tears. Before I get to my Philosophy Moment, let me first give you some quick history and significance.

History – Wikipedia

The custom of sending greeting cards can be traced back to the ancient Chinese, who exchanged messages of good will to celebrate the New Year, and to the early Egyptians, who conveyed their greetings on papyrus scrolls. By the early 15th century, handmade paper greeting cards were being exchanged in Europe. The Germans are known to have printed New Year’s greetings from woodcuts as early as 1400, and handmade paper Valentines were being exchanged in various parts of Europe in the early to mid-15th century, with the oldest Valentine in existence being in the British Museum.

[Read more about it here]

Importance – The Art File

Everyone loves to receive a card, either through the post or by hand. In this crazy fast, faster, fastest instant world that we all live its worth reflecting that the greeting card is still considered by most as the truly effective way of telling someone you really care. What’s more this has now been proved scientifically. Dr Lynda Shaw is the leading authority on research in this area…

     “Handwriting helps the brain to learn by improving fine motor skills and expression. It activates massive regions in the brain involved in thinking, language and working memory. It is intimate and reveals personality.

     We express emotion when writing a greeting card, therefore this is quite an awesome mix.

     Equally time is the most precious thing we have to give, so if we spend time choosing, writing and sending a card we are helping people feel valuable and worthwhile.

     Who would have thought a greeting card could do so much.”

[Visit The Art File here]

My Philosophy Moment

So here goes.

On your birthday when you receive birthday cards, along with gifts, hugs, calls, and praise, we read our cards. We appreciate the thought, we understand the words, we love the people who wrote ’em.

But is that all a birthday card is good for?

In my opinion, no. Birthday cards are perfect to read on your birthday. they give you strength. Those powerful words find a special place in your heart.

That’s it?

Well yes, and no. Birthday cards should be kept and read year-round. When you had a bad day at work, and need to hear you mother’s voice tell you that tomorrow will be better, read your birthday card. Someone said something said something rude and mean to you, and you need a lifting hand, read your birthday cards. Read the ones from your parents, your siblings. Read those cards that will pull you out of your situations. After all, those cards were made In the Name of Love (by the way, In the Name of Love is a really good song), why not read them in a time when immense love is needed.

Do you agree with My Philosophy Moment?

Write a small comment with your opinion.

Remember, Philosophy Moments happen all the time. you just have to remember to remember it.

Cite this article as: Serene Haroon, "Birthday Cards: History, Importance, and Philosophy Moment," in {sereneharoon.com}, January 27, 2017, http://sereneharoon.com/2017/01/birthday-cards/.

One thought on “Birthday Cards: History, Importance, and Philosophy Moment

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